Re: Researching maximum life span of the power supply of a small satellite.




<alphacentauri@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message
news:1153483564.944116.40080@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Atomic batteries:
Most satellites and space probes make use of nuclear. These batteries
are extremely durable. Even the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator
of the space probe voyager 1 still makes some 300 watts ( at launch
date 1977 it generated 470 watts) after 29 years of use. But nuclear
devices are the least desirable choice of power supply for a small
satellite orbiting the earth. If the satellite burns up in the
atmosphere the nuclear elements will cause a very dangerous pollution.

Possibly but the one used on the aborted Apollo 13 lander didn't burn up and
is believed to be intact and sitting at the bottom of the sea.

http://www.ne.doe.gov/space/space-desc.html

Some info..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator

However this is an example of a very small nickel-63 battery wich will
give electrical energy for over some 50 years! The power specs (volt,
amperes, watts) are not given.
http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/Oct02/cantilever.ws.html

but they also rely on radioactive decay so you would need roughly the same
amount of radioactive material as used in a conventional Radioisotopic
Thermoelectric Generator.






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