Re: What does TAU mean?



In article <WPJag.1211$UR3.79@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>, "Martin Rowley" <booty.weatherR+E+M+O+V+E@R+E+M+O+V+Entlworld.com> wrote:

Phred <ppnerkDELETETHIS@xxxxxxxxx>, in
<4d0dd8F161jnlU1@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

+ The JTWC frequently uses the acronym(?) "TAU" when referring to the
+ estimated time of an event.

.... not so much an acronym, but a letter from the Greek alphabet (see
for example ...

http://www.physlink.com/reference/GreekAlphabet.cfm

In the UK service, we denote same by the "T+hh" format, so we would
write something like .... " developing low moving quickly
east-northeast, expected just northwest of the Hebrides at T24 " (i.e.,
24 hours on from the initial time.).

Ah. Thanks for explanation, Martin. That makes sense: "TAU" is just
a nerdy way of saying "t" for "time" with the future sense implied.
I guess they did it to avoid the possibility of misinterpretation that
could result from a scrambled single letter in the navy's traditional
message systems; and it continues by habit or custom.

Cheers, Phred.

--
ppnerkDELETE@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

.