Re: 'A Thousand Winds'




"Bart Mathias" <mathias@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message news:c9SdnYMh7ee_KHnYnZ2dnUVZ_tijnZ2d@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
gavin wrote:
On Feb 28, 12:47 am, "B. Ito" <jg2...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

"em" <bradycard...@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message

news:1172538491.676848.87310@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> On Feb 25, 11:58 pm, Zhen Lin <l...@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

B. Ito wrote:

This is a very good poem and I liked the English translations.
Firstly I like the Japanese '眠ってなんかいません' for the English 'I
do
no sleep'

My apologies in advance if I'm reading it wrong here, but isn't this
poem originally English? I've known the English one long before the
Japanese one came out recently.

em

---------------------------------------------------------
Sorry, my expression 'the English translations' was wrong.
My quotation of "I do no sleep." was not correct, either.

Yes, the original of these words are English.

------------------------------------
B. Ito


The way the entire sentence is constructed, "I am not there, I do not
sleep," is rather poetic, because of the lack of any conjunctive, but
the phrase "I do not sleep" doesn't sound poetic at all in itself, as
far as I'm concerned.

You are correct in thinking that it represents much more than "I am
not sleeping", and it's much stronger. You could describe it as being
"I don't need sleep," "I am not a person who does things like
sleeping," "It's not a habit of mine to sleep," etc. It really sounds
like something a robot would say (because they don't sleep), or of
course, a dead person; a person who has passed on to a better place.

This interpretation of the *line in the poem* sounds very strange coming
from an English speaker.

Granted, "I do not sleep" could be an emphatic or stilted way of saying
"I don't sleep" = "I always stay awake," but in the poem it has to mean
"I'm not asleep, I'm dead."
--------------------------------------------------------------
Yes, that is also another transliteration that "I don't sleep.=I'm not asleep" or
"I'm not sleeping." means "I'm dead." (I'm really dead.)

-----------------
B. Ito

Bart

.



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